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Blood Pressure Measuring Monitors

Blood pressure is the force of ventricular contractions, arterial wall elasticity, peripheral vascular resistance, and blood volume and viscosity affects blood pressure, which is the lateral force that blood exerts on arterial walls. Blood pressure consist of systolic pressure and diastolic pressure readings.
Systolic (contract) vs Diastolic (relax)
Systolic pressure occurs when the left ventricle contracts. It reflects the integrity of the heart, arteries, and arteroles. Diastolic pressure occurs when the left ventricle relaxes. It indicates blood vessel resistance. Both pressures are measured in millimeters of mercury with a sphygmomanometer (aneroid or mercury) and a stethoscope, usually at the brachial artery.
Systolic pressure --- diastolic pressure = pulse pressure
Pulse pressure, or the difference between systolic and diastolic pressures, varies inversely with arterial elasticity. Normally, systolic pressure exceeds diastolic pressure by about 40 mm Hg. Narrowed pulse pressure, or a difference of less than 30 mm Hg, occurs when systolic pressure falls and diastolic pressure rises. These changes reflect reduced stroke volume, increased peripheral resistance, or both. Widened pulse pressure, or a difference of more than 50 mm Hg between systolic and diastolic pressure, occurs when systolic pressure rises and diastolic pressure remains constant or when systolic pressure rises and diastolic pressure falls. These changes reflect increased stroke volume, decrease periheral resistance, or both.

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